Film/Video-Based Therapy

Video and FIlmmaking as Psychotherapy: Research and Practice Edited by Joshua L Cohen and J. Lauren Johnson with Penelope Orr and a Foreword by Cathy Malchiodi

For a free webinar on this book: please visit www.yourdigitalstorytellingproject.com

This website is intended to create a collaboration between filmmakers, psychologists, anthropologists, psychiatrists, and art therapists in forming a discussion about the use of film and video based therapy. The content of the webpage is intended to be an appendix to the book Film and Video as Therapy:Research and Practice, to be published by Routledge in 2015. To order the book, please visit the following website

http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9781138781429/

 

In addition to promoting the book to help raise awareness of this intervention, we hope to gain feedback on the blog by facilitating communications with those interested in fostering the growth of this concept through questions, concerns, and/or ideas.  

 

 

Please feel free to explore the space within the webpage and ask questions on the blog.

 

This interactive space is meant to stir up questions as well as to inspire creativity and rethinking what it means to be a creative therapist

 

The use of film and video in/as therapy has a decades-long history in practice. Early work in this field included the post-World War II use of experimental, non-narrative films to calm veterans suffering from shell shock, and the 1970s saw boys in a group creating short films together to foster group cohesion, mastery skills, and better communication. With the advent of portable video equipment in the 1970s, female artists began turning the camera on themselves, making them the object of their own gaze. The precursor to the selfie’ Despite this fact, there is a dearth of literature on the theory and practice of using film/video production as therapy and the multidisciplinary practitioners who support its use. Copious literature exists discussing the use of several related media in a therapeutic context, such as photography, writing, drawing, music, and drama, but this body of literature is virtually vacant of film/video as a therapeutic medium. Despite the fact that there is little writing in this area, numerous practitioners from around North America and Europe are quietly working in this area – often independently, as the community of practitioners in this field is still quite small and geographically scattered. In an effort to build community among film/video-based therapy practitioners, and to introduce our work to others in our broader practice and research communities, we introduce this edited book on the theory and practice of film/video-based therapy. Representing the fields of anthropology, psychology, and art therapy, and perspectives as diverse as psychodynamic theory, and narrative theory, this book is the quintessential introductory resource for film/video-based therapy. This anthology is intended as an introductory foundation for the broad array of work we do in this exciting field, and is intended to introduce, justify, and explicate our practice to a broader audience.

New Force for Change Campaign #fvbt supports #forceforchange and all the causes they represent

Harrison Ford Announces New Force for Change Campaign In the Most Delightful Way Possible

 

UNICEF USA @unicefusa Nov 19
Contribute to @UNICEF & other causes, and get a chance to attend the premiere of the new @StarWars! http://bit.ly/1Y5cSlB ‪#‎ForceForChange‬Africa Cancer Foundation — working to promote the prevention of cancer and to provide holistic solutions for people affected by cancer in Africa. Nominated by Lupita Nyong'o.
Arts in the Armed Forces (AITAF) — bridging the cultural gap between the United States Armed Forces and the performing arts communities by bringing the best modern American theater to the military free of charge. Nominated by Adam Driver.
Barnardo's UK — giving the most vulnerable and disadvantaged children the chance to reach their full potential regardless of the issues they’ve faced in their lives. Nominated by Andy Serkis.
Central London Samaritans — providing emotional support for vulnerable people to alleviate feelings of distress and despair. Nominated by Anthony Daniels.
Damilola Taylor Trust — providing inner-city youths with opportunities to play, learn and live their lives free of fear and violence. Nominated by John Boyega.
fStop Warrior Project — using digital photography to help wounded warriors successfully transition to the civilian world after medical retirement from the military. Nominated by Harrison Ford.
Feeding America – working to feed America’s hungry through a nationwide network of 200 food banks and engaging the U.S. in the fight to end hunger. Nominated by Mark Hamill.
Make-A-Wish — making wishes come true every day for children suffering from life­-threatening illnesses. Nominated by Peter Mayhew.
Malala Fund — empowering girls through education to achieve their potential and create change in their communities. Nominated by J.J. Abrams.
PACER Center — expanding opportunities for children and youth with all disabilities, including mental health challenges such as depression and anxiety. Nominated by Carrie Fisher.
Phab — creating opportunities for children and adults of all abilities to enjoy life together. Nominated by Daisy Ridley.
St. Francis Hospice, Raheny — providing specialist palliative care to patients living in north Dublin city and county. Nominated by Domhnall Gleeson.
The Circle — working to achieve its vision of equality for women and girls in a fairer world. Nominated by Gwendoline Christie.
UNICEF — ensuring all children get a healthy start in life and have opportunities to reach their full potential. Nominated by Kathleen Kennedy.
Union of Concerned Scientists — advancing science-based solutions for our planet’s most pressing problems—from combating global warming to developing sustainable ways to feed, power, and transport ourselves. Nominated by Oscar Isaac.

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